To Kill a Mockingbird – Wolf Hollow

Let me first say that I don’t believe Harper Lee’s classic To Kill a Mockingbird is a book for children. Many of the schools have kids read it in middle school, which baffles me. I suppose it is because the book’s reading level is fifth-sixth grade, and it is an American classic, but there are so many social and emotional nuances, that I think older readers benefit more from its content.

Similarly, I was shocked Lauren Wolk’s Wolf Hollow was given a Newbery Honor this year. I was not at all shocked that the book had received critical acclaim – it is masterfully crafted and praise is well due. Rather, I was shocked that it had been recognized for the Newbery as opposed to the young adult Printz Award, because the content seemed more appropriate for teenagers than elementary-aged children.

Personal opinions aside, both To Kill a Mockingbird and Wolf Hollow will be read by kids, and as such, I thought I would include them on this site. I am not the first person to make connections between these novels. The accolades on the back cover of Wolf Hollow even acknowledge its close similarities to Mockingbird. At their cores, these books are very much alike, each starring a young female protagonist who is forced to reckon with injustice and prejudice in an imperfect world.

Many will already be familiar with To Kill a Mockingbird, so I will focus on Wolf Hollow. Annabelle lives in a rural American community during World War II. The arrival of fourteen-year-old Betty upends Annabelle’s simple world. Betty is a bully in the fullest meaning of the world, with her actions leading to life-and-death consequences. Betty’s brutality and callous nature make for downright uncomfortable reading, though Lauren Wolk deserves credit for not shirking away from difficult material. Annabelle must learn how to stand up for herself and her special friend Toby, a misunderstood World War I veteran who Betty blames for various tragedies in the community.

The heavy themes in both books could lead to some wonderful discussions in older readers. To Kill a Mockingbird includes accusations of rape, racial prejudice, and social injustice. Wolf Hollow deals with prejudice and bullying (be warned this is full-blown, physical-threat harassment, not merely name calling). In addition, there are some difficult passages of physical injury to children and Toby’s horrific war memories.

I believe both books are incredible works of literature and should be read by young people at some point in their education. Having said that, due to the mature content in both, I think fourteen and up is an appropriate age to introduce these books, though very mature readers may be able to handle them at age twelve.