Underwear

Bare bear is missing something… his underwear. His dad points out it’s over there, on the chair. This premise – the evergreen battle of parents trying to get their kids to bed – kicks off Jenn Harney’s comical picture book, Underwear.

With an ongoing rhyming scheme that seems to include all words rhyming with “bear,” Underwear is fun to read aloud. The pre-bed synopsis makes it a great choice to read before tucking your own kids into bed, with one caveat: all the giggles may have the opposite effect you wanted and make it more difficult for your kids to snuggle into their covers. It’s worth it.

We read this book multiple times in my house, and it garnered laughs each time. Harney’s illustrations add another layer of humor and energy to the clever text. If you’re looking for a quick and funny picture book to enjoy with little ones, I recommend Underwear. I suspect the target audience is ages 2-6, but don’t let that stop you from enjoying it with older kids, because Underwear is entertaining for all ages.

A Green Place to Be: The Creation of Central Park

Although I have traveled to many areas in the contiguous United States and various countries in Europe, I have never been to New York City. After reading A Green Place to Be: The Creation of Central Park by Ashley Benham Yazdani, I would love to visit the Big Apple and see this world-famous park.

Yazdani does a wonderful job of bringing to life the historical account of Central Park’s inception and construction. She includes interesting facts without bogging down the reader with too much technical terminology or trivial information. The illustrations are full of life, making the historical scenes appear fresh and present. From the broad, lush landscapes to the complete survey of the various bridges inside the park, the detailed illustrations are a feast for the eyes, welcoming multiple readings.

I recommend A Green Place to Be for readers who are looking for a beautifully illustrated slice-of-history story. It will probably be best for ages 6-10, though I do think artists of all ages will enjoy the beautiful illustrations.

Poetree

Poetree, written by Shauna LaVoy Reynolds and illustrated by Shahrzad Maydani, is a sweet friendship story that melds a love of poetry and a love of nature. Young Sylvia writes poems that she then takes to her friend, the birch tree. She never imagined the tree might write back.

And so begins the origin of the Poetree. In what appears to be a magical exchange of verse, Sylvia leaves poems with the tree and receives poems in return. When Sylvia finally discovers the truth behind her leafy pen pal, she has difficulty hiding her disappointment, but soon finds she may have made a new and unexpected friend after all.

Maydani’s lovely illustrations create a serene and gentle mood. Young readers would enjoy creating poems and illustrations of trees, flowers, birds, and other natural scenes after reading this lovely story.

I think Poetree is best for ages 4-8, though older kids will likely enjoy the story as well. There are many useful teaching tie-ins, including the topics of poetry, nature, and friendship.

Scranimals

Every year, my family does something to celebrate D.E.A.R. Day. (Drop Everything And Read was first mentioned in Beverly Cleary’s Ramona books, and is now observed on April 12, Cleary’s birthday.) This year, we did a Library Bingo of sorts, where we selected one book in each of 10 genres. With it also being National Poetry Month, one of our categories was poetry. While in the juvenile poetry section at our library, we stumbled on Scranimals by Jack Prelutsky, illustrated by Peter Sis.

While familiar with both Prelutsky and Sis, I had never heard of Scranimals, but it looked fun enough, and we gave it a try. It turned into a quick favorite. Each spread features a “scranimal” – an creature made of a mash up of animals, vegetables, and fruit, such as a Spinachicken, or my favorite, the Avocadodo. Scranimals reads well as a picture book as there is a hint of story arc to it, but you can certainly choose to read the poems of one or two creatures if you prefer to not read it all in one sitting.

Nothing about this book is serious or stuffy. The illustrations are fun, the poems are witty.  It’s playful poetry at its best, and of course, Prelutsky does it masterfully. I recommend this book for kids of all ages, but especially for those ages 4-8.

The Dress and The Girl

Talk about a picture book with an old soul. The Dress and The Girl, written by Camille Andros and illustrated by Julie Morstad, has a nostalgia about it, but in a way that is fresh and beautiful.

It’s the story of “an ordinary girl wearing an ordinary dress,” and their everyday comings and goings. One day, the time comes for the girl and the dress to leave home and set out for new adventures in a new land. Sadly, they are separated when the trunk holding the dress is not reunited with its owners after the long journey. The dress and trunk travel the world, unable to find the girl, until one day a woman pauses to look at a dress hanging in the window of a used clothing store.

Andros’s lyrical text rolls off the tongue, making this a beautiful book to read aloud. Morstad’s illustrations are understated but vibrant, which seems to bring the past into the present. With inviting cover and printed on thick, smooth paper, The Dress and The Girl is all around a beautiful book.

I recommend this book for ages 4 and up (though it certainly could be read to younger children as well). It could make a nice Mother’s Day gift or baby girl shower gift as well.

The Book With No Pictures

This book makes kids laugh. Hysterically. Or maybe that’s just mine. Over the last week, the best part of my day has been reading this book to my kids before bedtime. I think multiple readings have only increased the giggles, since my kids laugh in anticipation of what they know is coming next. For me, this makes The Book With No Pictures by B. J. Novak a worthy addition to our home library.

I love how this book promotes the importance of words in the most jubilant, undidactic way. It’s a great read aloud for children of all ages, for the littlest will giggle uncontrollably and even teens will be hard pressed not to smile. TIP: An exuberant performance is sure to bring the most laughs, which makes it most fun for the reader!

Locomotive

Locomotive by Brian Floca is one of my family’s favorite non-fiction picture books. Dense with information, but told in a narrative style, it’s perfect both for a school reading and a bedtime read-aloud. The text is long (for a picture book), but my train-loving son requested we read this book over and over to him when he was just three.

The artwork is amazing, so it’s no surprise that Floca won the Caldecott Medal for this book. Made with ink, watercolor, acrylic, and gouache, the illustrations capture an old-world feel, while still coming across as fresh and contemporary. Details abound. From the expansive western scenery, to the jaw-dropping Dale Creek Bridge, to the careful replications of the locomotive itself, one could easily spend time poring over these pages without reading any of the text. And don’t overlook the endpapers! They are full of facts and diagrams, adding more hard-core nonfiction material to the book.

Locomotive is perfect for train enthusiasts and would be an excellent addition to any U.S. History study. Mr. Floca provides extra materials on his website to supplement the book, including a coloring page of the locomotive (a favorite in our house!) and teacher’s guide. I heartily recommend this book for all ages, particularly 4-12 years old.

Knuffle Bunny

I admit it. The first time I read Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems, I thought the book had received too my hype. Fun? Sure. But a modern children’s classic? I wasn’t convinced.

Fast forward a few years. I decided to re-visit Knuffle Bunny, and I also read Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity and Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion . Maybe I needed the full trilogy experience. Maybe it was the way my son asked me to read all the books again and again. Maybe it was the way the final Note to Trixie gave me all the feels. This time there was no doubt in my mind: the Knuffle Bunny books are indeed modern classics.

The first, Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, introduces us to Trixie, her parents, and of course, her beloved Knuffle Bunny. Trixie’s toddler antics ensue when she accidentally leaves Knuffle Bunny in the laundromat, but lacks the verbal skills to tell her parents. The second, Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity, introduces us to Trixie’s classmate and fellow toy bunny lover, Sonja. Trixie and Sonja fight over who has the best bunny, but after an inadvertent switch leaves each with the wrong bunny, they have to come together in order to be reunited with their own Knuffle Bunnies. The third and final installment, Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion, takes Trixie, her parents, and Knuffle Bunny on a trip to Holland. Trixie is excited to see her grandparents, but devastated when she realizes she left Knuffle Bunny on the airplane.

The Knuffle Bunny books are funny yet poignant. I intend to gift them to newly expecting parents, as I think they belong in that special class of children’s books that are equally meaningful to parents as they are entertaining to kids. I enthusiastically recommend these books for kids ages 3-6, though don’t be surprised if the older kids still laugh and the adults fight back nostalgic tears.

The Eye That Never Sleeps

I’m a big fan of narrative nonfiction. For picture books, I particularly like historical nonfiction that highlights lesser known stories from the past. The Eye That Never Sleeps: How Detective Pinkerton Saved President Lincoln by Marissa Moss, illustrated by Jeremy Holmes tells the story of the assassination attempt on Lincoln before he was inaugurated as president in 1861. I think this story is particularly effective because it takes a well-known figure (Lincoln) and tells how a lesser known figure (Pinkerton) was important in shaping the course of history through behind-the-scenes action. Lincoln serves as the entry point for the story, drawing readers in and giving them context, but Pinkerton is the true agent of change in this book.

The book begins with a little back story on Pinkerton: how he came to the United States from Scotland with his wife, how he grew a successful barreling business, and how he eventually became involved in detective work. The story then moves quickly ahead to Pinkerton’s protection of Lincoln in the days before Lincoln’s presidential inauguration. Both text and illustrations do an excellent job of showing the tension between the northern and southern states so that readers feel Lincoln’s peril at every turn.

Holmes’ illustrations are detailed and precise, in red, orange, brown, and purple palettes. Multiple fonts are used throughout, from newspaper headlines to speech and thought bubbles, and this variation brings extra life into the illustrations. Holmes has an Artist’s Note at the end that describes how he created his work in digital scratchboard style, and this is a worthwhile read for those who are curious in artistic methods.

Even the formatting of this book is worth a mention. The pages are thick, and the book is in landscape orientation, which add to the richness of the illustrations. It’s longer than traditional picture books, coming in at 48 pages instead of the default 32, but even so, each page is utilized to the max. There are five pages of back-matter, including a timeline of Pinkerton’s life, Artist’s and Author’s Notes, bibliography, and index.

I recommend this book for ages eight and up, which differs from the publisher’s recommendation of ages 6-9. I do think that readers ages 6-7 could enjoy it as well, but due to the high word count and extra length, I think it more suitable for older elementary aged kids. The interesting story and amazing illustrations may very well tempt tweens and teens into reading it as well.

Rivers: A Visual History from River to Sea

“Geography” and “amazing” may not be two words commonly used in the same sentence when talking about books for young people, so let’s change that. River: A Visual History from River to Sea by Peter Goes is indeed an amazing book of geography for young readers. And old readers. Everything about this book, from the oversize pages and format to the detailed illustrations surrounded by interesting facts, says, “Read me! … Read me again!”

As one would deduce from the title, Goes uses the rivers of the world to relate geographical, historical, cultural and even biological information. Rivers are grouped together by continent, and then each major river has its own two-page spread. Each spread has a solid color background with Goes intricate black-and-white illustrations on top. Readers are given a wealth of information that all pertains to the river. For instance, on the spread for the Thames, we learn the river once was also called Isis, the Thames tunnel was built between 1825 and 1843, the kingfisher likes to live near running water, and the Thames Barrier protects London from high tides. And that’s just a small sample of interesting tidbits.

Rivers has a way of making non-fiction readily accessible to a younger audience, but it is so engaging and sophisticated that it in no way seems juvenile. I suspect teens would pore over these pages. I highly recommend this book for all ages, though I suspect ages eight and up will enjoy it most. Goes also authored the book Timeline, which I’ve not yet had the pleasure to read, but can’t wait to get my hands on if it’s as good as Rivers.