Rivers: A Visual History from River to Sea

“Geography” and “amazing” may not be two words commonly used in the same sentence when talking about books for young people, so let’s change that. River: A Visual History from River to Sea by Peter Goes is indeed an amazing book of geography for young readers. And old readers. Everything about this book, from the oversize pages and format to the detailed illustrations surrounded by interesting facts, says, “Read me! … Read me again!”

As one would deduce from the title, Goes uses the rivers of the world to relate geographical, historical, cultural and even biological information. Rivers are grouped together by continent, and then each major river has its own two-page spread. Each spread has a solid color background with Goes intricate black-and-white illustrations on top. Readers are given a wealth of information that all pertains to the river. For instance, on the spread for the Thames, we learn the river once was also called Isis, the Thames tunnel was built between 1825 and 1843, the kingfisher likes to live near running water, and the Thames Barrier protects London from high tides. And that’s just a small sample of interesting tidbits.

Rivers has a way of making non-fiction readily accessible to a younger audience, but it is so engaging and sophisticated that it in no way seems juvenile. I suspect teens would pore over these pages. I highly recommend this book for all ages, though I suspect ages eight and up will enjoy it most. Goes also authored the book Timeline, which I’ve not yet had the pleasure to read, but can’t wait to get my hands on if it’s as good as Rivers.

Drawn From Nature

Drawn From Nature by Helen Ahpornsiri is an exquisite picture book that will delight nature lovers, young and old. Ahpornsiri expertly uses real leaves, flowers, and other plant-derived items in collages that then create illustrations of animals and landscape. The intricate work demands a second look. And a third. And a fourth. And, well, you get the idea.

The stunning artwork alone makes this book superb, but the accompanying non-fiction text is also engaging and informative. We start by looking at the natural world during the spring season, and then follow the natural trajectory through the seasons all the way through winter. A glossary at the end is helpful for defining the more scientific terms that appear in the text, such as fungus, nocturnal, and photosynthesis. Curious artists will also appreciate Ahpornsiri’s note in the back that gives a little more information on how the art was created.

I highly recommend Drawn From Nature for all ages, but I think it would be best for ages eight and older. Although a picture book, it is in no way too juvenile for teens and adults. In particular, I suspect artistic and/or nature-loving teens will love this book and spend hours poring over its content.

Teach Your Giraffe to Ski

Great Spotties! Is that a GIRAFFE on the ski slopes?

The premise of a giraffe learning to ski is funny, for adults and kids. In Teach Your Giraffe to Ski (written by Viviane Elbee, illustrated by Danni Gowdy), a boy is trying to teach his giraffe the proper way to ski. But Giraffe doesn’t want anything to do with the bunny hill – he’s ready for the big, scary slopes! The boy will have to muster his courage if he’s going to catch and save his giraffe.

Teach Your Giraffe to Ski is certainly a fun choice for skiers and giraffe-lovers, but the underlying theme of overcoming fear make it a good read for a broader audience as well. Enjoy this book during the winter months, snuggled with your kids, while laughing at the antics of fearless (and often clueless) Giraffe as he learns to ski.

Blue

Stunning paintings, brilliantly placed cutouts, and the perfect thirty-two words make  Laura Vaccaro Seeger’s Blue one of my favorite pictures books of all time. Following in the style of her picture book Green, which won a Caldecott Honor, Seeger takes it one step further by adding an underlying plot of great emotional depth. I marvel at her ability to tell the life story of a boy and his dog over seventeen spreads, with minimal text. The result is profound and poignant.

I highly recommend this picture book for children and adults of all ages. Blue is a particularly good choice for anyone mourning the death of a pet. Younger children will appreciate the cleverness of the illustrations and cutouts, and at the very least, will learn to recognize various shades of blue. Older children will likely grasp the subtle plot and deeper feelings permeating through the book. I also recommend Green by the same author, though it is more about the colors and illustrations and does not have the same weight of the newer Blue.

The Bear and the Piano

For a picture book with an old soul that also feels fresh, look no further than David Litchfield’s The Bear and the Piano. At its core, this is a timeless story of friendship and belonging that dares to ask if one can return after leaving.

The story itself is a bit magical. A bear cub stumbles upon a piano in the middle of the woods. Captivated, he returns day after day, year after year, mastering the instrument. The other bears in the woods gather to hear him play, until one night a human family offers to take him to the big city so he can play concerts there. Though he loves his home and his friends, he also longs for adventure, and sets out for the city, where he soon achieves great success.

Though he enjoys his time in the city, he misses his home and decides to return to tell his friends all about his adventures. When he arrives in the familiar clearing in the woods, the piano is missing. The bear is certain everyone has forgotten him. That is, until he follows a fellow bear deeper into the woods to a startling discovery.

The illustrations in The Bear and the Piano are gorgeous. Using a mix of techniques, Litchfield creates expansive scenes that are both spacious and focused. The color palette is varied and lively, yet restrained, lending to the classic storybook feel.

The Bear and the Piano is a beautiful book for ages four and up. Younger children will enjoy following the bear’s adventures in the city. Older children and adults will value the story’s deeper meaning when the bear returns to the woods. All readers will appreciate the lyrical language and detailed illustrations.

The Day You Begin

The Day You Begin, written by Jacqueline Woodson and illustrated by Rafael López, is an all-around beautiful book. Woodson’s lyrical text conveys the anxiety young students experience when they feel different from their peers. The overall tone is perfectly expressed in the opening line. There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you. Children feel isolated because of their physical features, their ethnic lunches, their foreign names, their capabilities.

Three-fourths of the way through, the text shifts gradually with a subtle addition to the opening line. There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you until the day you begin to share your stories. The children learn to be true to themselves in order to make connections with their classmates. In the end, we find that maybe we are not very different from each other after all.

The illustrations burst with color and life. López creates an inner dream world superimposed on on the real one. While the children’s facial expressions show uncertainty and loneliness, we also get a glimpse of the exuberant spirit that is just waiting to pour out.

The Day You Begin would be a wonderful read-aloud choice for building empathy. I highly recommend this book for readers of all ages, particularly ages 6-10.

The Great Dictionary Caper

The Great Dictionary Caper, written by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Eric Comstock, is a fun romp with words. In a clever way, kids are introduced to various types of words, from the short (“I”) to “everyone’s favorite 34-letter word” (which you can maybe guess, but will have to read the book to find out if you are correct!).

Illustrations are words themselves demonstrating their meanings (we see the word “glide” ice skating). Without using any formal definitions, we learn the meanings of onomatopoeia, homophones, antonyms, palindromes, and anagrams. We find examples of proper nouns, rhyming words, contractions, interjections, and conjunctions. And oh yeah, some of Shakespeare’s created words, which are sure to draw laughs. (Do you know a kid that will laugh when you read the word “sackbut?”)

This book would be a great way to introduce types of words, and also as a review after any kind of formal unit study. There is no objectionable content in it for younger readers, but I doubt the younger set will understand it well. As such, I recommend this book for ages 8 and up, though maybe 6 and up for precocious readers.

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World

You get a cut. It bleeds. You need to carry on with your day – you don’t have time to cut and fold sterile gauze and adhesive bandaging. The good news is, you don’t have to, thanks to the Band-Aid.

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World – A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!) tells the story behind the often overlooked invention of the Band-Aid. Author Barry Wittenstein infuses humor in both the prose as well as the story’s structure. Just when one might think the story finished, we find out there’s more.

Commonplace as it is today, the Band-Aid was not an overnight success. Readers see how inventor Earle Dickson tweaked his prototypes to make them better and more user-friendly, yet this still wasn’t enough to entice the masses. Dickson used creative marketing tactics to help spread the word about his nifty bandages, which finally led to incredible success.

The frequent false happy endings make this a fun book to read aloud with kids. While not overt in any way, readers learn the valuable lessons of resourcefulness, ingenuity, and perseverance. Chris Hsu’s illustrations strike just the right tone, balancing the humorous with the historical. Three informational pages at the end provide the author’s context, historical timelines, and online resources. I recommend this narrative non-fiction book for ages four and up.

My Friend Maggie

Hannah E. Harrison both wrote and illustrate a strong story of friendship in My Friend Maggie. Maggie the elephant and Paula the beaver are best friends. By Paula’s own description, “Maggie’s the best!”

One day, fellow classmate Veronica mentions to Paula that Maggie is too big. Paula starts noticing other things about Maggie that aren’t so great. Paula wants to defend Maggie, but instead chooses to leave Maggie and play with Veronica instead. Maggie continues to seek out Paula, but Paula ignores her.

The tides turn when Veronica starts making fun of Paula’s teeth. Guess who comes to stand up for Paula?

Bullying is such a prominent issue plaguing today’s kids. My Friend Maggie is an appropriate book selection for ages 4-8 to aid in discussions about bullying and loyalty to our friends.

Be A Friend

Be A Friend is a beautiful book, with its theme succinctly expressed in its title. Dennis is a quiet boy that seems to live in his own world. Misunderstood by his peers, Dennis is often left to play by himself, with little hope of being included in the others’ games. And then Dennis meets Joy, a young girl who just gets him.

Salina Yoon’s illustrations are deceptively simple – strong lines, minimal background, but so expressive. Likewise, her text is sparse, but paired with the illustrations, the book tells a powerful story.

I recommend this book for ages 4 and up. Even older students will benefit from the simple message of being kind and reaching out to a lonely soul.