The Great Dictionary Caper

The Great Dictionary Caper, written¬†by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Eric Comstock, is a fun romp with words. In a clever way, kids are introduced to various types of words, from the short (“I”) to “everyone’s favorite 34-letter word” (which you can maybe guess, but will have to read the book to find out if you are correct!).

Illustrations are words themselves demonstrating their meanings (we see the word “glide” ice skating). Without using any formal definitions, we learn the meanings of onomatopoeia, homophones, antonyms, palindromes, and anagrams. We find examples of proper nouns, rhyming words, contractions, interjections, and conjunctions. And oh yeah, some of Shakespeare’s created words, which are sure to draw laughs. (Do you know a kid that will laugh when you read the word “sackbut?”)

This book would be a great way to introduce types of words, and also as a review after any kind of formal unit study. There is no objectionable content in it for younger readers, but I doubt the younger set will understand it well. As such, I recommend this book for ages 8 and up, though maybe 6 and up for precocious readers.

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World

You get a cut. It bleeds. You need to carry on with your day – you don’t have time to cut and fold sterile gauze and adhesive bandaging. The good news is, you don’t have to, thanks to the Band-Aid.

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World – A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!)¬†tells the story behind the often overlooked invention of the Band-Aid. Author Barry Wittenstein infuses humor in both the prose as well as the story’s structure. Just when one might think the story finished, we find out there’s more.

Commonplace as it is today, the Band-Aid was not an overnight success. Readers see how inventor Earle Dickson tweaked his prototypes to make them better and more user-friendly, yet this still wasn’t enough to entice the masses. Dickson used creative marketing tactics to help spread the word about his nifty bandages, which finally led to incredible success.

The frequent false happy endings make this a fun book to read aloud with kids. While not overt in any way, readers learn the valuable lessons of resourcefulness, ingenuity, and perseverance. Chris Hsu’s illustrations strike just the right tone, balancing the humorous with the historical. Three informational pages at the end provide the author’s context, historical timelines, and online resources. I recommend this narrative non-fiction book for ages four and up.